Nanoparticles Boost Impact Resistance of Special Type of Polymer



Iranian researchers used nanoparticles and epoxy resin simultaneously to increase impact resistance of a type of polymer that is commonly used in various industries.

Iranian researchers used nanoparticles and epoxy resin simultaneously to increase impact resistance of a type of polymer that is commonly used in various industries.

The produced nanocomposite has higher impact resistance than the similar samples.

Polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) is one of the most common semi-crystalline engineered polymers, which has high crystalline degree and rate, desirable chemical resistance and excellent thermal stability and current properties. In addition to the abovementioned properties, this polymer has wide applications in automobile manufacturing industry, electrical industry and other engineering applications due to its high shear strength, appropriate dimensional stability, specially against water, and high resistance to hydrocarbons.

Many researchers focus on increasing the low impact resistance of the polymer through increasing heat deflection temperature (HDT). In this research, efforts have been made to increase the low impact resistance of the polymer by using appropriate nanoparticles and resins.

Polymer blending or alloying is usually more economic than developing new polymers because engineered polymers can be used in a better manner through this method. Blending of the desirable polymer with cheap samples or other polymers with synergic effects gives alloys higher efficiency.

Results obtained from the research show that in PBT/epoxy alloy, tensile module of the final alloy increases when the curing agent or epoxy is added to the composite. In addition, nanoclay has higher toughness than the polymer matrix. Therefore, when nanoclay is put, distributed and dispersed in the polymer, the nanocomposite will have higher resistance and tensile module in comparison with pure PBT.

Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council

#Nanomaterials #Polymers

 

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