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Supermaterials build by Fractal nanostructures



These fractal nanostructures might one day be used in structural engineering supermaterials, featuring outrageous mechanical strength.

Professor of materials science and mechanics Julia Greer, calls a fractal nanotruss—nano because the structures are made up of members that are as thin as five nanometers (five billionths of a meter); truss because they are carefully architected structures that might one day be used in structural engineering materials.


Greer’s group has developed a three-step process for building such complex structures very precisely. They first use a direct laser writing method called two-photon lithography to “write” a three-dimensional pattern in a polymer, allowing a laser beam to crosslink and harden the polymer wherever it is focused. At the end of the patterning step, the parts of the polymer that were exposed to the laser remain intact while the rest is dissolved away, revealing a three-dimensional scaffold.

Next, the scientists coat the polymer scaffold with a continuous, very thin layer of a material—it can be a ceramic, metal, metallic glass, semiconductor, “just about anything,” Greer says. In this case, they used alumina, or aluminum oxide, which is a brittle ceramic, to coat the scaffold. In the final step they etch out the polymer from within the structure, leaving a hollow architecture.


Caltech

#Nanostructures #MaterialScience

 

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